Let’s talk about the history of Esports and why it’s relevant.

To understand what Esports is I will start off with a definition. Esports is described by dictionary.com to be a “competitive tournaments of video games, especially among professional gamers.” Which in layman’s terms just means people playing video games to win. This phenomenon might seem new but it has been around for decades. One of the first Esports tournaments was in October of ’72 when Stamford students played Spacewar to see who was best. When discussing Esports you might think of lavish prizes going up to millions of dollars but this first tournament was played for a year long subscription to Rolling Stones magazine.

Skip over a few years to 1980 and you have the Space Invaders Championship with an attendance of about ten thousand people and some media coverage. This could be seen as the foundation of the thing we now call Esports.

With the rise of the internet we also saw a change in the way people communicate. Talking to people in China from a bedroom in Breda has never been this easy. The move to competitive gaming from small rooms and gymnasiums to online tournaments came naturally. Big companies became savvy to this and started to sponsor championships of bigger games like Quake.

It even became so widespread that a Quake tournament by the name of Red Annihilation was held in may of ’97. Because it was nationwide and for a big prize (Lead developer of Quake his personal Ferrari), This tournament has been regarded by many to be the first official Esports tournament.

If you are interested in seeing how Tresh won this tournament you can see it right here:

Starcraft came along, and together with its expansion Brood War it would set the standard of the way people would look at Real Time Strategy games in a competitive setting. Its successor Starcraft II Wings of Liberty has multiple competitive leagues with the highest getting about 50 Million viewers.

Rabobank has recently announced that they will be remodelling a Sports hall in Purmerend to create the first Esports stadium in the Netherlands. They will also be adding a gaming club (which you can compare to a sports club) where you can train your digits and brain to become better and ‘git gud’

With our fellow dutchy Rojo (aka Dave Jong) winning 1 million euro’s at the last World Championship of Fortnight it became even more apparent that Esports are here to stay and little by little, it is going to take over the world.

Let’s talk again soon.

Patrick.

Let’s talk about the history of Esports and why it’s relevant.

To understand what Esports is I will start off with a definition. Esports is described by dictionary.com to be a “competitive tournaments of video games, especially among professional gamers.” Which in layman’s terms just means people playing video games to win. This phenomenon might seem new but it has been around for decades. One of the first Esports tournaments was in October of ’72 when Stamford students played Spacewar to see who was best. When discussing Esports you might think of lavish prizes going up to millions of dollars but this first tournament was played for a year long subscription to Rolling Stones magazine.

Skip over a few years to 1980 and you have the Space Invaders Championship with an attendance of about ten thousand people and some media coverage. This could be seen as the foundation of the thing we now call Esports.

With the rise of the internet we also saw a change in the way people communicate. Talking to people in China from a bedroom in Breda has never been this easy. The move to competitive gaming from small rooms and gymnasiums to online tournaments came naturally. Big companies became savvy to this and started to sponsor championships of bigger games like Quake.

It even became so widespread that a Quake tournament by the name of Red Annihilation was held in may of ’97. Because it was nationwide and for a big prize (Lead developer of Quake his personal Ferrari), This tournament has been regarded by many to be the first official Esports tournament.

If you are interested in seeing how Tresh won this tournament you can see it right here:

Starcraft came along, and together with its expansion Brood War it would set the standard of the way people would look at Real Time Strategy games in a competitive setting. Its successor Starcraft II Wings of Liberty has multiple competitive leagues with the highest getting about 50 Million viewers.

Rabobank has recently announced that they will be remodelling a Sports hall in Purmerend to create the first Esports stadium in the Netherlands. They will also be adding a gaming club (which you can compare to a sports club) where you can train your digits and brain to become better and ‘git gud’

With our fellow dutchy Rojo (aka Dave Jong) winning 1 million euro’s at the last World Championship of Fortnight it became even more apparent that Esports are here to stay and little by little, it is going to take over the world.

Let’s talk again soon.

Patrick.