Music, it binds us as a society and civilisation. It is a way of transporting us to a different realm in our mind or gives us a physical and emotional outlet for stress. In this thing we call music we can define a lot of different genres and sub-genres. At this moment I would like to take you on a trip down memory lane through the different eras in electronic music.

One of the first instruments to be used for electronic music would be the theremin. This strange looking has two antennas which sense the relative position of your hands in between them. This oscillates and controles the frequency with one hand and amplitudes with the other. After this the frequency will be amplified and send to a loudspeaker.

Check out the theremin here:

Were going to skip a few decades to when electronic music became a lot more relevant to the mainstream audience.

In 1980 somewhere in Chicago Acid House was born. The typical Acid sound were squelching shrieks and deep baselines (produced by the Roland TB-303 drum sequencer). The United Kingdom and Europe quickly adopted it into their culture.

One of the first (maybe even THE first) Acid tracks was Phuture’s Acid Tracks from 1987. Have a listen here:

Because of this type of music, clubs began to open all over the UK. The Netherlands created their own electronic music called gabber (or hardcore). This was their reaction to the vastly growing commercialisation of the house music scene and influenced by early hardcore from Frankfurt and New York. The first recognised Gabber track was by the Euromasters titled “Amsterdam, waar lech dat dan?” These Gabber tracks characterised themselves by stripping down the track to a rough bass drum at a high speed.

Besides Gabber tracks the Netherlands also specialised themselves into Eurodance with the Venga Boys, Two Brothers on the Fourth Floor and 2 Unlimited to name a few.

In more modern days we have seen the rise of trance, with djs like Tiesto and Armin van Buuren at the helm. This tension building, 110 – 150 BPM (Beats Per Minute) combines a lot of different electronical musical styles to convey a hypnotising vibe with one to two drops in each track.

To this day, electronic sub genres keep appearing with smaller genres like glitch-hop and their bigger brother dubstep having emerged within the United Kingdom and Hardstyle, Raw-style and uptempo having gained traction within the Benelux.

Music binds us together, even if you don’t like the styles we talked about you can’t deny the impact they all have had during the last few decades.

Lets talk again soon.

Patrick

Music, it binds us as a society and civilisation. It is a way of transporting us to a different realm in our mind or gives us a physical and emotional outlet for stress. In this thing we call music we can define a lot of different genres and sub-genres. At this moment I would like to take you on a trip down memory lane through the different eras in electronic music.

One of the first instruments to be used for electronic music would be the theremin. This strange looking has two antennas which sense the relative position of your hands in between them. This oscillates and controles the frequency with one hand and amplitudes with the other. After this the frequency will be amplified and send to a loudspeaker.

Check out the theremin here:

Were going to skip a few decades to when electronic music became a lot more relevant to the mainstream audience.

In 1980 somewhere in Chicago Acid House was born. The typical Acid sound were squelching shrieks and deep baselines (produced by the Roland TB-303 drum sequencer). The United Kingdom and Europe quickly adopted it into their culture.

One of the first (maybe even THE first) Acid tracks was Phuture’s Acid Tracks from 1987. Have a listen here:

Because of this type of music, clubs began to open all over the UK. The Netherlands created their own electronic music called gabber (or hardcore). This was their reaction to the vastly growing commercialisation of the house music scene and influenced by early hardcore from Frankfurt and New York. The first recognised Gabber track was by the Euromasters titled “Amsterdam, waar lech dat dan?” These Gabber tracks characterised themselves by stripping down the track to a rough bass drum at a high speed.

Besides Gabber tracks the Netherlands also specialised themselves into Eurodance with the Venga Boys, Two Brothers on the Fourth Floor and 2 Unlimited to name a few.

In more modern days we have seen the rise of trance, with djs like Tiesto and Armin van Buuren at the helm. This tension building, 110 – 150 BPM (Beats Per Minute) combines a lot of different electronical musical styles to convey a hypnotising vibe with one to two drops in each track.

To this day, electronic sub genres keep appearing with smaller genres like glitch-hop and their bigger brother dubstep having emerged within the United Kingdom and Hardstyle, Raw-style and uptempo having gained traction within the Benelux.

Music binds us together, even if you don’t like the styles we talked about you can’t deny the impact they all have had during the last few decades.

Lets talk again soon.

Patrick