A whale might be known to you as a rather large species of aquatic mammals but this isn’t what I was alluding to in the title of this article.

No the type of whale I am talking about is the financial kind. Let me explain: In free to play games you normally get Premium currencies, cosmetics, boosterpacks etc.. These have to be bought with a currency in the game be it coins, credits or diamonds. This type of games are targeted towards whales, or rather people willing to spend their hard earned cash on digital goods with trivial or no added real value.

The first game to ever use this type of currency was the Japanese version of MapleStory. This game gave you a “Gachapon ticket” for 100 yen per ticket, which in turn gave you a randomised game item when used in an in-game booth. Since then a whole slew of games have created their own type of currency and even packs or Lootboxes.

One good example for this is Candy Crush, sure you can wait until you can finally play that next level which you failed, or you could pay a small amount to play again. These Micro Transactions are what these games are built around. Ways to get you to pay some extra money to keep you playing and get you hooked.

Lootboxes is another concept to be weary of. These randomised boxes will entice you to buy them for that small chance to get that gun you want, that rare card or even a whole new character.  There is a whole new algorithm which creates fair chances for you to win them (Provably fair), but even with that algorithm chances are slim most of the time.

Provably fair has also been used by casinos to ensure that everyone has the same chance of winning and ‘the house’ doesn’t have a too high of an advantage. It works by creating a cryptographic hash which isn’t hackable. When getting this hash you won, if you did not get it you lose.

Take this article with a grain of salt because everyone is entitled to do with their money as they please. But just be wary towards the addictive nature of these types of games.

Let’s talk again soon,

Patrick

A whale might be known to you as a rather large species of aquatic mammals but this isn’t what I was alluding to in the title of this article.

No the type of whale I am talking about is the financial kind. Let me explain: In free to play games you normally get Premium currencies, cosmetics, boosterpacks etc.. These have to be bought with a currency in the game be it coins, credits or diamonds. This type of games are targeted towards whales, or rather people willing to spend their hard earned cash on digital goods with trivial or no added real value.

The first game to ever use this type of currency was the Japanese version of MapleStory. This game gave you a “Gachapon ticket” for 100 yen per ticket, which in turn gave you a randomised game item when used in an in-game booth. Since then a whole slew of games have created their own type of currency and even packs or Lootboxes.

One good example for this is Candy Crush, sure you can wait until you can finally play that next level which you failed, or you could pay a small amount to play again. These Micro Transactions are what these games are built around. Ways to get you to pay some extra money to keep you playing and get you hooked.

Lootboxes is another concept to be weary of. These randomised boxes will entice you to buy them for that small chance to get that gun you want, that rare card or even a whole new character.  There is a whole new algorithm which creates fair chances for you to win them (Provably fair), but even with that algorithm chances are slim most of the time.

Provably fair has also been used by casinos to ensure that everyone has the same chance of winning and ‘the house’ doesn’t have a too high of an advantage. It works by creating a cryptographic hash which isn’t hackable. When getting this hash you won, if you did not get it you lose.

Take this article with a grain of salt because everyone is entitled to do with their money as they please. But just be wary towards the addictive nature of these types of games.

Let’s talk again soon,

Patrick